Stone based Mirrors

Katharina Eisenkoeck uses natural materials, including leather and stone, to produce interior pieces with intriguing sculptural qualities.

Katharina Eisenkoeck works in natural materials and is based in London but originally from Austria.

Katharina comes from a family of designers and architects, and started learning carpentry techniques at design school in Gratz, Austria. She trained as an architect in Vienna, before moving to the UK to take a degree in Arts, Design and Environment at London’s Central St Martin’s College of Art.

Her work really focusses on the materials themselves – exploring, understanding and being inspired by their innate qualities to make objects which are not only simple, beautiful and sculptural but also functional and useful. She experiments with different techniques in order to create uniquely characterful objects that will last a lifetime.

She is interested in the revival of ancient techniques and craft processes, in bringing them into a new context, and this is particularly apparent in her leatherwork. In her stonework, she explores and derives inspiration from naturally occurring contrasts and textures, using them in strong, masculine pieces as well as more delicate, feminine items such as jewellery.

She is influenced by other areas of design, including architecture, and by designers or architects who employ a holistic approach to their work (such as Le Corbusier, whose all-encompassing vision for buildings included even such small details as the door handles).

Working from her London studio, she thrives on the buzz of living and working in the Capital, she does admit that she likes to visit the countryside for inspiration (or peace and quiet) and she travels back to Austria to recharge.

The stone for her work is, where possible, taken from otherwise redundant sources, for example from a disused quarry in Wiltshire. She also sources around Europe and from further afield (India, Morocco and Mexico).

Author's Choice

These pieces aren’t easily defined as sculpture, home accessories or furniture but exist in the space between. They are both useful and decorative - artistic statements that are also functional.

We chose for these solid stone mirrors for AUTHOR's collection. These circular mirrors, edged in bronze, are held upright by a weighty stone base. The stone is heavy - solid yet partially translucent, and the nature of the stone means that each piece has unique characteristics.